Avoir

Mido mari bibbi buy (J’ai beaucoup d’enfants)
Himo mari bibbi buy
Hida mari bibbi buy
Hibe mari bibbi buy

Medeng mari bibbi buy
Befo be mari bibbi buy

Kambe hibbe mari bibbi buy ( Ils ont beaucoup d’enfants)
Befou mabbe  bibbi buy

 

 

 

J’ai  –  Mido
Je n’ai pas

Tu as – Hida mari
Tu n’as pas

il a – Oda no mari
il n’a pas

Elle a – Beda hido mari
Elle n’a pas

 

Nous avons – enen hido mari
Nous n’avons pas

Vous avez – ono hido mari
Vous n’avez pas

ils ont  – Befo be mari
Ils n’ont pas

Elles ont – Kambe fo hibe mari
Elles n’ont pas

ETRE –

Min  – Je suis
Tu es – An
il es – odo / oda

 

Nous somme  – ennen
Vous etes – onon
Ils sont onon
Elles sont – ono

Min ko Raja – je suis Raja
An ko Tori
Oda ko Mr. Galass

Ennen ko worbe ( Nous sommes des homme )
ONON ko roube  (Vous etes femmes)

Onon ko Nigeriani
Ono ko Nigeriane

piattaforma petrolifera (Agenzia: corbis) (NomeArchivio: 5531_q2p.JPG)

   

piattaforma petrolifera (Agenzia: corbis) (NomeArchivio: 5531_q2p.JPG)

    
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FUDODE III – DIALOGUE III

Shopping –  ACH
Claire:  Hido mari saabunde?(Do you have soap?) Miðo faala soodude saabunde.  (I want to buy soap.)   Onye Yai saabunde? (Vendez vous du savon?)
Raja: Hii hi . Hameden Yeya (Oui, on vend le savon). 

Claire:  Tamaati on ko jelu? How much are the tomatoes?
Raja:  Kilo on ko 5 euro. Tamaati on no moyyi. (Good tomatoes)

Claire:  Hido mari tamaati? Miðo faala soodude tamaati. I want to buy tomatoes.
Raja:

Claire:   Ko basaale mi faala. It’s onions that I want
Raja:

Claire:  No satti. That’s expensive.
Raja: No yom bi. (c’est mois cher )

Claire:  Fii sooðugol ko jelu? How much is it really?
Raja:

Claire:  Ðuytanan seeða. Come down a bit for me
Raja: Biensur. Mi doui tante (Je te diminue un peu)

Claire:  On ðuytataa seeða? Won’t you come down a little?
Raja:

Claire:  Beydu seeða. Give me a little more.
Raja:

Claire:  No moýýi. That’s good.
Raja:

Claire:  Miðo yiiði ðun. I like that (J’aime ça)
Raja:

Claire:  A maraa cewdi wuluure? Don’t you have change for a thousand?
Raja:

Claire:  Maaro no woodi? Is there rice?)
Raja:

Raja: Maaro alaa. There is no rice.

Raja :  Maaro no woodi. There is rice

Claire:  Hiðon jogii saabunde? Do you have soap?

Raja:  Mi jogaaki saabunde. I don’t have soap.

Raja:  Miðo jogii saabunde. I do have soap.

Claire:  Hiðon mari pompiteeri? Do you have potatoes?

Raja:  Mi maraa pompiteeri. I don’t have potatoes.
Raja:  Miðo mari pompiteeri. I do have potatoes.

Claire:  Ko honto mi heBoto farin? Where could I get flour?
Raja: Ko honto oni super mercato.

Marugol means to possess, keep, save, or have stored away.
Claire:  Hiða mari ñiiri? Do you have rice?

Mariam: Himo mari BiBBe buy. He has many children.
Mariam: Himo mari amis buy. He has many children. ( Mido mari bibbe buy – j’ai beaucoup d’enfants.

Claire:  Maranan seeða! Save me some!

 

 

that so raven

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FUDODE 1 – DIALOGUE 1

Raja – Assalamualaikum  , A jaraama , On jaraama?
Abdul –  Oalaikumassalam
Mariam – Oalaikumassalama

Raja – A jarama, Honno wai?
Abdul –  Hida e jaam, Jaraama buy, Jaraama fota, Jaraama mi Weltike
Mariam – Hida e jaam, Jaraama buy, Jaraama fota, Jaraama mi Weltike

Raja –  Ko Honno inneteda?
Abdul –   Min ko Abdul mi innete, An le?
Mariam –  Min ko Mariam mi innete, An le?

Raja –  Min ko Raja mi innete, Ko honto iwuda?
Abdul –   Min ko la Guine mi iwi.
Mariam – Min ko France mi iwi.

Raja –  Abdul, Ko honno wi’eteða?
Abdul –   Min ko Abdul mi innete, An le? Mariam?
Mariam –  Min ko Mariam mi innete.

Raja –  Onongoi kohonno inetedon?  Kohonno maketedon? ( Plural / formal)
Abdul –   Min ko Abdul mi innete, Onongoi kohonno inetedon?
Mariam –  Min ko Mariam mi innete,

Raja –  Ko honno yetteteða? (Yettoore maa?)
Abdul –   Min ko TORI mi yetta. Ko honno yetteteða? (Yettoore maa?)
Mariam –  Min ko LECLERC mi yetta.

Raja –  Yettoore maa ko honno?
Abdul –   Min ko TORI mi yetta. Ko honno yetteteða? (Yettoore maa?)
Mariam – Min ko LECLERC mi yetta.

Raja –  ko honno be yettuma? (Yettoore maa?)
Abdul –   Min ko TORI mi yetta . ko honno be yettuma? (Yettoore maa?)
Mariam – Min ko LECLERC mi yetta

Raja –  Yettoore maa ko honno?
Abdul –   Min ko TORI mi yetta
Mariam –  Min ko TORI mi yetta

Raja –  Innde maa ko honno? (Innde maa? )
Abdul –   Min inde anden ko Abdul. Innde maa ko honno, mademoiselle? (Innde maa? )
Mariam – Min inde anden ko Mariam.

Raja –  Ko honðun nii?  What is this?
Abdul –   Ko karambol nii  e pulaar. Ko honno “karambol” innete e francais, Mariam?
Mariam –  Ko stylo oko bic nii  e francais. Ko honðun woni “fijugol”, Raja?

Raja –  Mariam, fijugol ko woni samakala e pulaar oko jouer e francais.  Ko honno ðun innete e Pular? ( What’s this called in Pular? )
Abdul –   ðun do Ko  “montre”  innete e Pular. In Pulaar, it is called  “Rist watch”?
Mariam –  ðun do Ko  “Watch”  innete e inglese.

Raja –  Abdul, Haliree ðoy. ( Speak slowly)  fi Allah. Mi nana ta(= Je ne comprends pas). ( Mi fa ma ta (= Je ne comprends pas).) ( Mi nissi = desolé) ( Mi nisiti= desolé).  Fillitee fi Allah. Please repeat.
Abdul –   Bien sùr. Mi mi woulai doi doi. ( Je parle lentement )
Mariam –  Joni( Maintenant) Mi naani. ( Now I understad) (fa ma seeda= mieu/ better/meglio ))

Raja –  Ko honto iwuðaa?
Abdul –   Ko india mi iwi. Saree Honde iwuðaa France? Mariam (From which town of France?)
Mariam –  Mi ko Paris mi iwi.

Raja –  No butti seeða, Abdul? Are you better, Abdul?
Abdul –   Hii hi No butti buy. Jaraama buy.
Mariam –  f

Raja –  Yo Alla beydu aafiya.
Abdul –   (No moýýi. That’s good.) Jaraama Raja, Yo Alla beydu aafiya.
Mariam –  On Jaraama onon di do, Yo Alla beydu aafiya.

Raja –  En bimbi si Allah Jabi
Abdul –   En bimbi si Allah Jabi, OWO
Mariam –  En bimbi si Allah Jabi, OWO

 

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COMPARISONS

COMPARISONS
The verb burugol is used to make comparisons. By itself, it means “to be better.”
Taksi no buri kaar. A taxi is better than a bus.
Lagine no buri Senegal. Guinea is better than Senegal.
Sellu no buri Aliu. Cellou is better than Aliou.

These are all rather vague sentences. To be more precise, we use burugol as a modal verb, which makes another verb comparative.
Taksi no buri kaar sattude. A taxi is more expensive than a bus.
Lagine no buri Senegal laaåeede. Guinea is more beautiful than Senegal.
Sellu no buri Aliu kaanude. Cellou is uglier than Aliou.

These structures also work:
Taksi no satti buri kaar. A taxi is more expensive than a bus.
Ko taksi buri kaar saatude. A taxi is more expensive than a bus.

This last form is more emphatic and would be used, for example, to contradict something that had been said. The word burugol is also used for superlatives:
Ko an buri stajeerbe ben fow labeede. You are the prettiest trainee. (literally, “You are prettier than all the trainees.”)

The word fotugol is used to express equality. In this context it always takes the habitual form.
Hibe fota. They’re the same.

This word can also be used as a modal verb to indicate in what way two items are the same.
Fatu e Binta no fota juutude. Fatu is as tall as Binta.

Notice two differences between the usage of fotugol and burugol: fotugol always takes the habitual form (no fota) and not the stative (no buri); and with fotugol, the items being compared are all in the subject (you don’t say *Fatu no fota Binta juutude).

 

 

Phrasebook: 

Ko honðun nii?  What is this?
Ko karambol nii.  This is a pen.

Ko honto Saajo woni?  Where is Saajo?
Saajo no Maamun.  Saajo is in Mamou.
Saajo no ka maakiti.  Saajo is at the market.

Ko honno ðun innete e Pular?  What’s this called in Pular?

Ko honno “livre” innete e Pular?  How do you say “book” in Pular?

Ko honðun woni “fijugol”?  What does “fijugol” mean?

Haliree ðoy.     Speak slowly.

Fillitee.  Please repeat. ( Filitee fi Allah )

Leemuneere nden no ka hoore deftere. ()

Deftere nden no ka ley karambol.  ()

Caabiije ðen no ka takko deftere. ()

Mi weelaaka. I am not hungry

 

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Ko hombo yahi ka maakiti hande?
Ko min yahi ka maakiti hande. It is I who went to the market today

Ko honto yahuða hande? Ko ka maakiti mi yahi hande. It is to the market that I went today.

Ko honde tuma yahuða ka maakiti? Ko hande mi yahi ka maakiti. It is today that I went to the market.

Ko honðun muusay maa? What hurts you?
Ko honto muusay maa? Where does it hurt?
Ko honðun waðu maa? What’s wrong with you?
Ko hoore nden muusata lan. It’s my head that hurts.
Hoore an nden no muusude lan. My head is hurting me.
Ko honðun nangu maa? What do you have? (LIT. What caught you?)
Ko jonte nangu lan. I’ve got malaria.
Miðo wondi e jalbi. I have worms.
Goððun øatii lan. Something bit me.
Bandu an ndun no wuli. I have a fever. (LIT. My body is hot.)
No butti seeða? Are you better?
No ndikki seeða? Are you better?
A jayti seeða? Are you better?
Yo Alla beydu aafiya. May God bring you peace

Himo waawi dogugol. He can (really) run.
Be waawataa Pular. They can’t (speak) Pular

Ko honto o yahata?  Where is he going? OR Where will he go?
Ko ka saare o yahata.  It is to town that he is going. OR It is to town that he will go.

Ko min woni lanðo. I’m the boss.
Wonaa min woni lanðo. I’m not the boss.

Ko honðun wonuða e ñaamude? What are you eating?

Wonaa Aliu mi innete. My name isn’t Aliu.

Tamaati on ko jelu? How much are the tomatoes?

Miðo faala soodude tamaati. I want to buy tomatoes.

Ko basaale mi faala. It’s onions that I want.

No satti. That’s expensive.

Fii sooðugol ko jelu? How much is it really?

Ðuytanan seeða. Come down a bit for me.

On ðuytataa seeða? Won’t you come down a little?

Beydu seeða. Give me a little more.

No moýýi. That’s good.

Miðo yiiði ðun. I like that.

A maraa cewdi wuluure? Don’t you have change for a thousand?

Maaro no woodi? Is there rice?

Maaro alaa. There is no rice.

Maaro no woodi. There is rice.

Hiðon jogii saabunde? Do you have soap?

Mi jogaaki saabunde. I don’t have soap.

Miðo jogii saabunde. I do have soap.

Hiðon mari pompiteeri? Do you have potatoes?

Mi maraa pompiteeri. I don’t have potatoes.

Miðo mari pompiteeri. I do have potatoes.

Ko honto mi heboto farin? Where could I get flour?

Marugol means to possess, keep, save, or have stored away.
Hiða mari ñiiri? Do you have rice?
Himo mari bibbe buy. He has many children.
Maranan seeða! Save me some! 1
Jogagol means to have on one’s person or to hold.
Himo jogii labi. He has a knife (on him).
Joganolan nden deftere. Hold this book for me.

The most common way to negate marugol and jogagol is alaa.
Mi alaa kaalisi. I don’t have any money.
O alaa labi. He doesn’t have a knife.

But you can also use the verb’s own stative negative form:
Mi maraa kaalisi. I don’t have any money.
O jogaaki laåi. He doesn’t have a knife (on him).

Hebugol means to obtain or to get. It also means to have as in to have a child. Unlike marugol and jogagol, it is not a stative verb.
Mi hebaali teew. I didn’t get any meat.
O hebii boobo gorko. She had a boy.

jeyugol  jon
Jeyugol means “to own”.
Ko min jey ðee gese. Those fields are mine.
Ko hombo jey ndee deftere? Whose book is this?
Wata mo ýettu ko o jeyaa. One shouldn’t take what doesn’t belong to one.
The participle is jon, meaning “owner” (see participles, page 90). Jeyðo is also heard. Ko honto jon oto on woni? Where’s the owner of the car?
Jon leemune, arii! You with the oranges, come over here!
Jon is a common way of identifying people with specific attributes.
jon hakkil smart person
jon goððun wealthy person
We also have:
jon bitiki = shopkeeper
jon galle = husband
jon suudu = wife

Miðo jaanga. I’m cold.
Hande no buubi. It’s cold today.
Miðo ngulaa. I’m hot.
Hendu no waði. The wind is blowing.
Naange ngen no wuli. The sun is hot.
No nibbiti. It’s dark.
Ndiyan aray hande. It will rain today. (LIT. water will come today)
Jaangol no ton. It’s cold there.

Ko oto hombo woni e yahude Labe? Which car is going to Labé?
Ko Labe mi yahata. I’m going to Labé.
Mi yobay pilaasi ðiði. I’ll pay for two seats.
Oto on heewi? Is the car full?
On siwaa yahude? Will it be a while before you leave?
Ko kilyanbe njelo manki? How many more pasengers do you need?
En yahay kisan? Will we leave immediately?
Mi hoolaaki ðun. Yeah, right.
Paasi on ko jelu? How much is the fare?
Kun sakun yobetaake. I shouldn’t have to pay for that little bag.
Ko ka haakunde mi wonata. I’ll sit in the middle.
Mahen. Let’s go.

Ðuuðugol is a very important verb in Pular that has no direct equivalent in English. It means to be numerous, excessive, common, or frequent.
Fulbe no ðuuði Abidjan. There are a lot of Fulbe in Abidjan.
Ðate no ðuuði, a majjay. There are too many paths, you’ll get lost.
Yimbe ðuuðaa rewirde ton. People don’t pass that way very often.
Himo ðuuði arsike. He has a lot of luck.
Be ðuuðaa haala. They don’t talk much.
The trick is to get out of the habit of using buy (a lot, very) where ðuuðugol can be used.
Fulbe buy no Abidjan (Many Fulbe are in Abidjan) would be correct, but the above example is much more natural.

yaawugol  – to be quick
O yaawii faamude – She understood quickly.
wayrugol – to be a long time since
Mi wayrii maa yi’ude – I haven’t seen you for a while.
ðuuðugol  – to be frequent, numerous
Himo ðuuði yahude – He goes often.
juutugol  – to be long
Mi juutii ðaanaade  – I slept for a long time.

on jaraama buy – Thank you very much

hande  – today
jango  – tomorrow
faðði-jango  – day after tomorrow
hanki  – yesterday
hecci-hanki  – day before yesterday
ontuma  – then; at that time
woo  – each; every
kala   – each; every
ado  – before
ðoo e…  between now and…
si   – if, when, before
tuma  – when (habitual; future)
nde  – when (future)
fewndo  – when (past)
wonde wonde  – sometimes
saa’i goo  – sometimes
tuma goo  – sometimes
soono woo  – sometimes
kenen  – often
si tawii…  – if it turns out that…
ko adii kon…  – first of all…
si ðun feýýi…  after that happens…
kisan  – immediately
ðon e ðon  – immediately
jooni jooni  – very soon

O jangay Pular ñande woo ñande. –  He studies Pular every day.

Be yahay Labe lewru kala.  – They go to Labe every month.

Himo naana Pular. He understands Pular.

Bee mi yaha kisan.  (Il faut que j’aille tout de suite –  (I must go immediately.)

Yo Alla joððinirbe jiidi e jawdi. ( May God provide children and wealth)

Mi yobay mo. Mi yobanay mo.  I will pay him. I will pay for him.
Mi yahay ton. Mi yahanay mo ton.  I’ll go there. I’ll go for him there. (I’ll go get him).
Miðo gollude. Miðo gollande mo.  I am working. I am working for him.

The word gooto means ”one.” It is an adjective .
Himo mari debbo gooto tun. He only has one wife.
Mi yahaali ton hay nde wootere . I haven’t gone there even one time.
It also means “the same.”
Ko be neene gooto . They have the same mother.
Ko e galle goote be hoði. They live in the same compound.
Ko gootun . It’s the same thing.

Portoobe goo no kaani ( Some white people are ugly )

sikkugol
Sikkugol means “to think” or “to believe.”
Mi sikki ko o biððo Cerno. I think he’s Cerno’s son.
Mi sikkaa si himo ton. I doubt if he’s there.
A sikkay ko o Pullo. You’d think he was a Pullo.
Miðo sikkude mi yahay. I’m thinking I’ll go.

When used in the stative, it implies doubt or suspicion.
Woo o wallay men, kono miðo sikki. He says he’ll help us, but I’m not sure.

To emphasize that a belief is no longer held, the past markers hari or -no- can be used.
Hari mi sikki ko samakala. I thought it was a joke.
Mi sikkuno ko samakala. I thought it was a joke.
It can also be used to ask a question politely.
Mi sikki hiåe ðanni? Perhaps he is sleeping?
lieber-vier-frauen-als-nur-eine-polygamie-in-suedafrika-41-666756213148392922_0aa8cb9f0f_bcar1girl-10Ik2qGAIlieber-vier-frauen-als-nur-eine-polygamie-in-suedafrika-41-66675621raja-shahed-red-cross-volunteer-in-venice-4a28fa96-8b36-4676-b422-8a295a5709d9woman_anddonkeyfulani-fula-raja-shahed4792792627_8b9de341cf_b160260-004-E3787A2E583fc3014ec23b08b9849aa55d23237e21bb8c6b9b188fa6b00c891de9e50b50160260-004-E3787A2Efulani-fula-raja-shahed

 

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